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4 Tips to being more water wise

Posted by Tag Pop on

Giving the planet a helping hand is just a matter of making one simple change at a time. The more we all do our part – the faster we can create an entire ecology of living that promotes sustainability. Below are few easy ways to be more water wise.

1. Incorporating thrift into your wardrobe

Did you know it takes over 700 gallons of water to make just one cotton t-shirt? Not just T-shirts either, it takes over 1800 gallons of water to make a single pair of jeans too. Not to mention the rest of your wardrobe. In fact, the clothing industry is a major consumer of resources and the world's 2nd biggest polluter. Incorporating thrift into your wardrobe lengthens the lifecycle of clothes that already exist and helps to keep our landfills from turning into laundry piles.

2. Opt for reusable water bottles

Keeping a nice, BPA-free water bottle in your bag is an insanely simple way to save the cost of a three-dollar bottle of water. Bottled water is incredibly wasteful on so many levels: An estimated 80 percent of them don’t get recycled and, because of the plastic production process, it takes three times the amount of water in a water bottle to produce just one.

3. Turn off the tap

It’s an all-too-common habit to leave the tap running while washing your face, brushing your teeth, doing the dishes, and so on. Sure, the tap might get a little soapy if you turn it off while lathering your hands, but think of it like turning off a light when it’s not being used—it’s simple, brings no inconvenience, and saves a lot of resources in the long run. You can save 200 gallons of water a month just by turning off the faucet while you brush!

4. Take shorter showers

We all love the feeling of a nice, hot shower, but five minutes is really all we need. Shaving even one minute off of the daily shower will save nearly a thousand gallons of water every year, which translates into big savings on the water bill—and it’s better for the planet.

 

 

 

Sources: EPA, Greatist & Savers

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